Recalled to Life

Though eight million men died in the Great War, they represented approximately a quarter of the total casualties. Death was far from an uncommon occurrence but a soldier was more likely to be gravely wounded than to die. The men who were plucked from the brink of death were not the same men who had…

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The Most Astonishing Expression of Vitality!

Today’s post is about Nadar, the great French photographer and certainly one of the most interesting people I’ve come across. Nadar was born Gaspard-Félix Tournachon in Paris in April of 1820 to middle-class parents. His father was a publisher and bookseller, but not a very successful one. Victor Tournachon went broke in 1833 and died a…

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The Montparnasse Derailment

On the afternoon of October 22, 1895, Guillaume-Marie Pellerin, the engineer of the Granville–Paris Express train, was irritable. He was behind schedule, though it was anyone’s guess why, since the train left Granville at 8:45 a.m., its usual time. Pellerin hated to be late. The speed of steam locomotive No. 721 may have been slowed by its cargo.…

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